How To Get Publishers To Send You Books

How do you find a Literary Agent. How do you find the right publisher to send your book to.

I’m trying to figure out how to get ahold of the right publishing house for a certain book, (kids book) How a Literary Agent works exactly, how to send in your work, (typed and printed? Or no?) Just need answers to any of that sort. Thank you.

The Writers Market and the Writers and Artists Yearbook are both books that contain information about literary agencies, how to contact them, what genres they represent etc. If you’re unsure about whether or not they would consider your genre then visit their website and check their submission guidelines. Don’t violate the submission guidelines – for example don’t ever send a supernatural book to someone that only accepts chick lit. Agencies have their guidelines and they don’t break them, no matter how good your book is.The average submissions package to an agency would include a cover letter, a synopsis, (usually 1-2 pages) and the first three chapters of your book. However, you really do need to pay close attention to the submission guidelines because some agencies ask for three chapters, some ask for five, some ask for one etc. If you can’t follow the guidelines, then the agency probably won’t bother to read the submission.Don’t expect to hear back from anyone right away since agencies receive hundreds of submissions a week. It’ll probably be a couple of months until you hear anything. If you do receive a rejection, don’t expect it to be personalised. Most rejected manuscripts are sent back with a standard rejection slip. Again, this is because of the huge volume of submissions that agencies receive. They don’t have time to respond to everyone personally.Don’t send a manuscript in that’s full of mistakes and errors, assuming an editor will fix it. They won’t. They will just send it back with a rejection slip.If an agent does offer to represent you then they will work with you to edit and polish your manuscript until it sparkles.The agent will then pitch your book to publishers on your behalf and try and secure you the best deal. If you are very lucky, you might find that more than one publisher is interested and then the book would go to auction. But it is rare for publishers to be fighting over one book. Usually, if a publisher is interested in your book, they will offer you a small advance.

How to get your book published.

i wrote a novel..its part of a series of books but at the moment only one is complete…i want to send a copy of it to a publisher but not sure how to go about itwhat are the name of good publishers in ireland that are sort or well known?what is the percentage of the the cost the book go to the publishers?how…

There are two ways to go to publish a book. One is to pay for it, with no expectation of selling it to anybody who’s not a friend or family, no matter how good it is or how much you work and/or spend to market it.The one I recommend is the one that gets your book into chains like Barnes & Noble, Chapters, and Borders, and independent book stores, too. This requires a “real” publisher who pays you for the right to print your book, and who then markets it, including placing it in stores.The big “name” publishers usually accept book manuscripts only from literary agents, using them to screen out manuscripts that aren’t likely to sell as books for whatever reason.To get a literary agent, identify agents who have recently sold other novels like yours. This takes time and trips to a big bookstore, usually. Jot down the names of the authors in your genre whose books are currently on bookstore shelves. Look inside for thanks and dedications, where agents may be named. At home, do a search of each author’s name, in quotation marks, and the word agent and learn who represents whom. Visit QueryTracker.com, GuidetoLiteraryAgents.com, and similar sites to identify agents seeking work like yours.Research each agent. Find websites with career history, sales, personal bio, AAR membership, etc. Determine whether they prefer email or regular mail for queries. Figure out who’s a good fit for you. Don’t be afraid to aim high. The worst that can happen is they say no.Write a one-page query letter, tailoring it to individual agents as it’s possible with the information you got from research, and send it to the few agents you’d most like to represent you. If the query letter is really good and you’ve done your homework well, at least some will ask for a partial or full manuscript. If none does, rewrite the query before sending out the next batch.

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How do you get your writing to a publisher.

Does anyone have addresses to publishers or ways to get your writing published into a book?

After you get Writer’s Market, research the publishers. Don’t get impatient and just start mailing to them.Research them. Start eliminating the ones that are NOT right for your manuscript. Get it down to a short list.ALWAYS check the publisher’s website for the latest guidelines. The book and the website don’t always agree, and the website is more up-to-date.I found some in the book that had gone out of business by the time I was ready to contact them (it was Summer of this year, and I was using the 2007 edition).The reason for all this caution, is that you don’t want to send to the wrong publisher. Most do not want simultaneous submissions, and the ones that aren’t right for you will just waste your time (and you will waste their time).Also, get some books about publishing….there are lots of them….and read a few. It’s not as straightforward as people will tell you.Best wishes,James

How do you get a book into publishers hands, and who do you send the book to.

I love to write, and if some of you have noticed I write and write when answering a question…and it’s just a passion and I’m good at it, and know I would be a great author…but, where do you begin to find people to publish your book…I know you can do it yourself, but, I don’t have enough money….I…

I’m glad to read that you love to write. Keep it up. If you believe in your writing and invest your time and effort in it, you will find some way to publish it.The type of publication company you’ll want will depend on the type of book you are writing. Is it fiction or non-fiction? What genre? Which age group is it intended for? How long is it?With enough information, I (or someone like me) could give you some specific recommendations.You might also find yourself a copy of the current edition of Writer’s Market, or perhaps Novel & Short Story Writer’s Market. The same publisher, Writers Digest Books, also offers a Guide to Literary Agents. There is also a “for dummies” book available — Getting Your Book Published for Dummies — which might be useful. Not that I’m calling you a dummy! This series and others like it are meant for people who want simple, basic information in an easy to use format.Reputable publishing houses are quite selective and typically respond to literary agents representing authors rather than to unsolicited manuscripts. Agents tend not to be interested in unpublished authors. If you have published other work, however, you may find one willing to work with you. In many cases, it’s useful to put aside a major work — a novel, for example — and publish short fiction, etc., for a while in order to begin a writing career before trying to sell your magnum opus.Almost any book can find its way to press somehow. Self-publication is always an option. If you decide to self-publish, Lulu.com is a fantastic option.As I said, keep writing!

How can you prepare your story/book to send to a publisher.

Where are publishers in Ft Lauderdale Florida and how should I present my story? One more thing, how do I get an illustrator?

For one thing you do NOT send a rough draft of your story to Tate Publishing. They are a vanity press. Check out http://anotherealm.com/prededitors/pebt.htm for a list of good and bad (eg Tate) publishers.Another good place to start is Absolute water cooler’s advise for new writers on how to submit to publishers http://absolutewrite.com.

how to send book to publisher.

i am 15 but i am a VERYYYYY talented writer i haven wirtten a book and would just like an email of a publisher (they dont have to be big or anything) just to see what they say and it has to be free any help?

First of all you never ever send a manuscript to a publisher unless they requested it – talented or not. You send a query letter and a synopsis – or whatever the specific publisher asks for in their guidelines. In that query letter, clearly state your age. Withholding that information will cause a lot of problems for you. Always be honest about how old you are.Secondly, you do not even do that until your manuscript has been through at least one rewrite and an edit. According to the way you wrote above, you need to do that for both content and spelling/grammar errors. You should put the manuscript away for about 2 months so that when you do the rewrite, it is fresh in your mind. Stephen King uses a formula for a rewrite. Rewrite = First Draft – 10%.Next, the book you need to buy is called Writers Market. Resist the urge to go right to the listings and actually read the front section first. It will help you with the process tremendously.Next, you only e mail a publisher who states in the submission guidelines that they accept e mails. Otherwise they will never read it and you will never know. Every publisher is different. As for the size of the publisher, you cannot approach the top ten publishers without an A List agent representing you. They do not deal with authors directly. Anything you send them will be destroyed. They just don’t have the staff or the time to handle unsolicited work.Before you send anything to anyone, make sure you have thoroughly checked them out through the standard Writers Beware sites. There are a lot of frauds and scams out there waiting for young kids–especially ones who expressover-exuberance when it comes to their talents. Do not write what you wrote about in a query letter. It will be discarded immediately. Or a dishonest publisher will see your over-enthusiasm and take advantage of you. Be professional. Always.If and when a publisher or agent expresses interest in your work, you will be asked to send in a partial or full manuscript and a book proposal. That is a very important document. It is your #1 selling tool. There are books that teach you how to write one. Get a book and work on a proposal. They generally take a week or so to write and have to be done very precisely.Lastly, no publisher or agent on earth will just read your book to let you know what they think. They will not give you a critique. 99% of the time, rejection letters are straight form letters that state “Thank you for your query, but you don’t seem to be what we are looking for right now.” Nothing else.If you want a critique, join a real life writers group. Try the library or local bookstores. Go there a few times and really get to know the group before you offer to share your work. That is a good way to get a critique. Another way is to ask a teacher or librarian to mentor you. Do NOT post it online and ask for advice. You subject yourself to plagiarism and publishers do not want to look at work posted on the internet. It is too complicated for them to determine original ownership and too likely the work has been stolen already. They will just reject you.If you want to know more, go to my profile and look at the starred Q and A. I star all the ones on publishing and writing. Several successful authors have posted here. Feel free to read through and use any that may help. Pax-CPS Avoid Lulu and all self publishers/vanity publishers and POD’s. Most of them are scams out to rip off kids like you. They make it sound FREE but it is anything but free. Your books will never see the inside of a bookstore and you will never see a penny from them. Self publishing preys on young authors like the one above me. Avoid them.

how to send book to publisher.

i am 15 but i am a VERYYYYY talented writer i haven wirtten a book and would just like an email of a publisher (they dont have to be big or anything) just to see what they say and it has to be free any help?

First of all you never ever send a manuscript to a publisher unless they requested it – talented or not. You send a query letter and a synopsis – or whatever the specific publisher asks for in their guidelines. In that query letter, clearly state your age. Withholding that information will cause a lot of problems for you. Always be honest about how old you are.Secondly, you do not even do that until your manuscript has been through at least one rewrite and an edit. According to the way you wrote above, you need to do that for both content and spelling/grammar errors. You should put the manuscript away for about 2 months so that when you do the rewrite, it is fresh in your mind. Stephen King uses a formula for a rewrite. Rewrite = First Draft – 10%.Next, the book you need to buy is called Writers Market. Resist the urge to go right to the listings and actually read the front section first. It will help you with the process tremendously.Next, you only e mail a publisher who states in the submission guidelines that they accept e mails. Otherwise they will never read it and you will never know. Every publisher is different. As for the size of the publisher, you cannot approach the top ten publishers without an A List agent representing you. They do not deal with authors directly. Anything you send them will be destroyed. They just don’t have the staff or the time to handle unsolicited work.Before you send anything to anyone, make sure you have thoroughly checked them out through the standard Writers Beware sites. There are a lot of frauds and scams out there waiting for young kids–especially ones who expressover-exuberance when it comes to their talents. Do not write what you wrote about in a query letter. It will be discarded immediately. Or a dishonest publisher will see your over-enthusiasm and take advantage of you. Be professional. Always.If and when a publisher or agent expresses interest in your work, you will be asked to send in a partial or full manuscript and a book proposal. That is a very important document. It is your #1 selling tool. There are books that teach you how to write one. Get a book and work on a proposal. They generally take a week or so to write and have to be done very precisely.Lastly, no publisher or agent on earth will just read your book to let you know what they think. They will not give you a critique. 99% of the time, rejection letters are straight form letters that state “Thank you for your query, but you don’t seem to be what we are looking for right now.” Nothing else.If you want a critique, join a real life writers group. Try the library or local bookstores. Go there a few times and really get to know the group before you offer to share your work. That is a good way to get a critique. Another way is to ask a teacher or librarian to mentor you. Do NOT post it online and ask for advice. You subject yourself to plagiarism and publishers do not want to look at work posted on the internet. It is too complicated for them to determine original ownership and too likely the work has been stolen already. They will just reject you.If you want to know more, go to my profile and look at the starred Q and A. I star all the ones on publishing and writing. Several successful authors have posted here. Feel free to read through and use any that may help. Pax-CPS Avoid Lulu and all self publishers/vanity publishers and POD’s. Most of them are scams out to rip off kids like you. They make it sound FREE but it is anything but free. Your books will never see the inside of a bookstore and you will never see a penny from them. Self publishing preys on young authors like the one above me. Avoid them.

On average, about how many times would you have to send your book to a publisher until it might get accepted.

*Please excuse length, but you seem to need this knowledge:*If you send a book to any publisher who has not asked for it, you may send it hundreds of times, and get it right back, as that is not the right way to get published.The best way I know to learn how to get published, to learn the correct steps to take, is to study the first section of The Writer’s Market, current edition, until you practically know it by heart.For example, and you may already know this, you do not copyright your work (when you write it, as you write it, put your name and a date [I have often simply put a year on longer work] in the header, and keep a copy at home, on hard-drive, disc or print-out, even all 3; that IS your copyright, even as you work) …you don’t get an ‘official’ copyright because the copyright, in an agreed upon form, is what you sell a publisher.Also, publishers (and agents, who are excellent to try for first because they know the market and those involved in it so well, and are excellent guides {but check them out first through a link in The Writer’s Market} through the whole business of both publication and selling your book)…publishers and agents don’t have time to read whole unsolicited manuscripts.They read queries, and those who read unsolicited queries are listed, as well as what types of work they are interested in. (No one who does not accept unsolicited queries will read an unsolicited query.)Queries are gone into at length in The Writer’s Market, with tips from people in the book field [authors, publishers, editors, agents] and examples of ‘good’ and ‘bad’ queries for both magazine and book publication.All of this is available to you through this book, and much more. If you can’t afford it, suggest you study it at a public library, copying relevant pages on the library’s free copier and making notes if you can’t check the book out, since it is a reference book.You can also take a look at what this book is all about at:http://www.writersmarket.com and for $3.99 a month, be able to see everything in it at any time and whenever anything new is added.Best of luck with your book.ADD: (and I rewrote some of the above, as always) Remember perserverance, patience, practice and promise. Keep any rejection that also includes a personal note from anyone sending it, as those are worth your attention as a ‘foot in the door.’If you are 100% behind your work and have already revised it as much as possible (you may want an editor’s help; I use an editor before sending anything out– or anyone knowledgeable who will read with a fresh eye for error) don’t lose self-esteem from rejections. We all get them.

How do you go about getting a publisher to look at your book.

I was wondering how you would go about sending out a manuscript to publishing companies, How do you keep them from taking your work as there own and etc?

There are a tiny number of publishers who accept unsolicited manuscripts (those that don’t go through a literary agent), so getting an agent first is a really good idea.After you have finished writing your book, typed it in proper manuscript format, edited it many, many times to make it as good as it can be and gotten it proofread by someone who knows what they are doing,Visit http://www.agentquery.com or, at the library or bookstore, look for Bowker’s Literary Marketplace, Writer’s Market 2011 or Jeff Herman’s Guide to Literary Agents. Look for agents that handle your genre, and are looking for new clients. Read, and follow, their submission requirements.Those books will have something about writing a query letter, which is what you send to the agent first. It’s part synopsis of your book, and part explanation as to why your book should be published. You have only that one-page letter to wow the agent, so take the time to make it a good one.Expect the whole process to take lots of time, and expect many rejections. When you are accepted by an agent, they will send your book to publishers, not you.Except for postage, the entire process of getting an agent is FREE, until a publisher buys your book. That is when the agent gets their cut, usually 15%, of the money that goes to you. Run away from any agent who asks for money upfront.Good luck!

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